As classicists and ancient historians, we call for Britain to remain in the European Union. The study of classical antiquity has been pan-European since before the Renaissance; today, these intellectual exchanges are supported and encouraged by EU institutions. We believe that the interests of British universities, their staff and students, as well as the wider future of our country and our continent, are best served by staying In.
What has the EU ever done for us? Apart from making it easier for British students and researchers to travel and work in other European countries and for European scholars and students to come here, funding collaborative research projects and infrastructure, promoting peace and co-operation, encouraging intellectual and cultural exchange, and the sanitation…

As classicists and ancient historians, we study the earliest civilisations in Europe and their continuing legacy. We know as well as anyone the dubious nature of claims about an unbroken European cultural tradition from classical antiquity to the present, and the uses to which such claims were put in legitimising European conquest and exploitation around the world. However, we have no doubt about the existence of a vital tradition of engagement and debate with classical texts, artefacts and examples as one of the constituents of European culture; and we have no belief at all in the idea of a pure British culture, isolated from any 'continental' influence, either as a historical reality or as a desirable future aim.

The study of classical antiquity has been pan-European since before the Renaissance. Today, these intellectual exchanges are supported and encouraged by EU institutions: enabling the free movement of students and researchers across the continent, funding collaborative and individual research projects, developing the underlying infrastructure, and making possible the presence in British universities of so many brilliant continental colleagues and interesting students. If we leave the EU, Britain might be able to retain some access to research funding, but only after a period of destabilising uncertainty; and increased barriers to movement would impoverish British research by discouraging students and researchers from coming here and by making it harder for British students and researchers to work overseas.

These issues are common to all scientists and researchers, not just classicists; but perhaps we feel it strongly because we are engaged with the histories and cultures of other European countries and of Europe as a whole, and work so closely with European colleagues. At the least, we need to add our voices to those of scientists and historians, making it clear how much damage Brexit could do to the intellectual, scientific and cultural life of our country.

University of Bristol
University of Warwick
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Exeter
King's College London
University of Oxford
Swansea University
University of Bristol
University of Edinburgh
University of Oxford
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
University of Exeter
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford
University College London
University of Oxford
University of Wales Trinity St David
University of Bristol
University of Manchester
Institute of Classical Studies
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Exeter
University of Cambridge
University of Wales Trinity St David
University of Edinburgh
University of Nottingham
University of Manchester
Cardiff University
Royal Holloway University of London
University of Leeds
University of Durham
University of Edinburgh
University of Oxford
University of St Andrews
University of Reading
University of Oxford
University of St Andrews
University of Sheffield
University of Nottingham
University of Exeter
University of Durham
Swansea University
University of Cambridge
Swansea University
University of Exeter
University of Oxford
University of Leeds
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford
University of Edinburgh
Open University
University of Nottingham
University of St Andrews
University of Oxford
University of Nottingham
University of Leeds
University of Manchester
University of Oxford
University of Wales Trinity St David
University of Exeter
Swansea University
University of Oxford
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford
University of Exeter
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
King's College London
University of Exeter
University of Oxford
Swansea University
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Edinburgh
University of Oxford
University of Edinburgh
University of Reading
University of Oxford
University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
University of Reading
University of Reading
University of Oxford
University of Birmingham
University of Leeds
University College London
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
University of Oxford
Keele University
University College London
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford
Insitute of Classical Studies
University of Glasgow
University of Bristol
Professor Neville Morley
University of Bristol

Ancient economic and social history, reception of antiquity

Dr. Carol Atack
University of Warwick

Greek political thought and its reception

Dr. Amin Benaissa
University of Oxford

Greek literary and documentary papyri

Dr. Lisa Bendall
University of Oxford

Aegean prehistory, Mycenaean religion

Dr. Ed Bispham
University of Oxford

Roman Italy, ancient history

Dr. David Blackman
University of Oxford

Ancient maritime history

Dr. Sophie Bocksberger
University of Oxford

Archaic and classical Greek literature and culture

Professor Barbara Borg
University of Exeter

Classical archaeology, tombs and burials

Professor Hugh Bowden
King's College London

Ancient religion

Dr. Angus Bowie
University of Oxford

Classical literature

Dr. Evelien Bracke
Swansea University

Greek myth, poetry and linguistics

Professor Richard Buxton
University of Bristol

Ancient Greek myth and literature

Professor Douglas Cairns
University of Edinburgh

Classics & Ancient History

Professor Averil Cameron
University of Oxford

History and literature of the late antique and early Byzantine period

Dr. Lilah Grace Canevaro
University of Edinburgh

Greek poetry

Dr. Mirko Canevaro
University of Edinburgh

Greek history

Dr. Filippo Carla
University of Exeter

Roman economic and social history, classical receptions

Professor Paul Cartledge
University of Cambridge

Ancient Greek history

Richard Catling
University of Oxford

Greek history and archaeology

Dr. Paola Ceccarelli
University College London

Ancient Greek history

Dr. Katherine Clarke
University of Oxford

Ancient historiography

Dr. Matthew Cobb
University of Wales Trinity St David

Interactions between Rome and India

Dr. Emma Cole
University of Bristol

Reception of ancient literature in contemporary theatre

Professor Kate Cooper
University of Manchester

Larte antiquity

Dr. Hannah Cornwall
Institute of Classical Studies

Roman history

Professor Armand D'Angour
University of Oxford

Greek music, ancient language, literature and culture

Dr. Chris Dickenson
University of Oxford

Public space in the ancient world

Dr. Katharine Earnshaw
University of Exeter

Latin literature

Professor Pat Easterling
University of Cambridge

Ancient Greek literature, history of texts

Dr. Kyle Erickson
University of Wales Trinity St David

Hellenistic history

Professor Andrew Erskine
University of Edinburgh

Hellenistic history, Roman imperialism

Dr. Lynn Fotheringham
University of Nottingham

Roman oratory, reception of antiquity in popular culture

Professor Roy Gibson
University of Manchester

Latin Literature

Dr. Kate Gilliver
Cardiff University

Roman army, ancient military history

Dr. Liz Gloyn
Royal Holloway University of London

Latin literature and Roman philosophy

Dr. Penelope Goodman
University of Leeds

Roman history, Roman urbanism and the emperor Augustus

Professor Barbara Graziosi
University of Durham

Ancient Greek literature and its reception

Dr. Lucy Grig
University of Edinburgh

Roman literary and material culture, especially late antiquity

Dr. Peter Haarer
University of Oxford

Professor Stephen Halliwell
University of St Andrews

Greek literature and philosophy

Dr. Katherine Harloe
University of Reading

History of classical scholarship, reception of antiquity

Professor Stephen Harrison
University of Oxford

Latin literature

Dr. Jon Hesk
University of St Andrews

Ancient Greek literature and culture

Dr. Julia Hillner
University of Sheffield

Europe 300-750 AD: late Roman law.

Professor Stephen Hodkinson
University of Nottingham

History of Sparta and its reception

Dr. Claire Holleran
University of Exeter

Ancient economic and social history

Dr. Philip Horky
University of Durham

Ancient philosophy, intellectual history

Professor Mark Humphries
Swansea University

Late antique history

Mr. Steven Hunt
University of Cambridge

Pedagogy of Latin language

Dr. Heather Hunter-Crawley
Swansea University

Roman art and religion

Assoc. Prof. Elena Isayev
University of Exeter

Ancient History

Dr. Lucy Jackson
University of Oxford

Ancient Greek and Roman drama and performance

Dr. Rick Jones
University of Leeds

Roman Empire archaeology, urbanism, frontiers

Anna Judson
University of Cambridge

Bronze Age Aegean writing systems

Dr. Georgy Kantor
University of Oxford

Roman law and institutions, epigraphy, Asia Minor

Talitha Kearey
University of Cambridge

Latin literature, reception of Virgil

Dr. Adrian Kelly
University of Oxford

Ancient Greek epic, lyric and dramatic poetry

Dr. Gavin Kelly
University of Edinburgh

Roman history, late antiquity, Latin literature

Professor Helen King
Open University

Gender and medicine in the ancient world

Professor Doug Lee
University of Nottingham

Late antique history

Dr. Sian Lewis
University of St Andrews

Ancient Greek political and social history

Professor Andrew Lintott
University of Oxford

Roman republican political history

Dr. Helen Lovatt
University of Nottingham

Greek and Latin epic, reception of antiquity

Dr. Regine May
University of Leeds

Latin language and literature

Dr. Roberta Mazz
University of Manchester

Graeco-Roman Egypt, late antiquity

Professor Andrew Meadows
University of Oxford

Greek history, epigraphy and numismatics

Dr. Fiona Mitchell
University of Wales Trinity St David

Ancient Greek literature and myth

Professor Lynette Mitchell
University of Exeter

Ancient Greek history and politics

Dr. Adam Mosley
Swansea University

History of science and astronomy

Mai Musie
University of Oxford

Ancient novel, postcolonial studies

Thomas Nelson
University of Cambridge

Ancient Greek literature

Lucia Nixon
University of Oxford

Prehistoric and classical archaeology

Professor Daniel Ogden
University of Exeter

Greek religion, traditional narratives, Hellenistic dynasties

Professor Robert Parker
University of Oxford

Greek history, religion and epigraphy

Professor Christopher Pelling
University of Oxford

Greek and Latin literature and historiography

Dr. Emily Pillinger
King's College London

Latin poetry, reception of antiquity in music

Dr. Martin Pitts
University of Exeter

Roman archaeology

Dr. Jonathan Prag
University of Oxford

Ancient Sicily, Roman history

Dr. Maria Pretzler
Swansea University

Greek history, ancient geography and travel writing

Professor Nicholas Purcell
University of Oxford

Ancient History

Dr. Josephine Crawley Quinn
University of Oxford

Ancient history

Dr. Richard Rawles
University of Edinburgh

Ancient Greek poetry and its reception

Professor Tim Rood
University of Oxford

Greek historiography and its reception

Dr. Ben Russell
University of Edinburgh

Roman archaeology, art and architecture

Professor Ian Rutherford
University of Reading

Early Greek poetry, ancient religion, links between Greece and Egypt

Professor Richard Rutherford
University of Oxford

Greek and Latin literature, especially Homer, tragedy

Matthew Scarborough
University of Cambridge

Greek, Latin and Indo-European philology and linguistics

Professor Malcolm Schofield
University of Cambridge

Ancient political thought and philosophy

Dr. Kim Shahabudin
University of Reading

Ancient Greece in popular cinema

Dr. Alex Smith
University of Reading

Roman Britain, especially rural settlement

Professor Bert Smith
University of Oxford

Classical archaeology and art

Professor Diana Spencer
University of Birmingham

Roman thought and literature

Dr. Emma Stafford
University of Leeds

Ancient Greek social and cultural history

Dr. Julietta Steinhauer
University College London

Greek religion, Hellenistic history

Dr. Peter Stewart
University of Oxford

Roman sculpture, Greek and Roman art

Professor Oliver Taplin
University of Oxford

Ancient Greek literature

Dr. Peter Thonemann
University of Oxford

Greek history, epigraphy and numismatics

Dr. Anjo Ulbrich
University of Oxford

Archaeology and history of ancient Greece and Cyprus

Dr. Lucy Van Essen-Fishman
University of Oxford

Greek poetry and tragedy

Dr. Richard Wallace
Keele University

Ancient literature and history

Professor Hans van Wees
University College London

Ancient History

Professor Tim Whitmarsh
University of Cambridge

Ancient Greek literature and culture

Professor Andrew Wilson
University of Oxford

Archaeology of the Roman Empire

Professor Greg Woolf
Insitute of Classical Studies

History and archaeology of the ancient world

Dr. Sophia Xenophontos
University of Glasgow

Plutarch, Galen, Greek literature

Dr. Vanda Zajko
University of Bristol

Reception of classical myth and literature

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